logo


Newly settled in Costa Rica, a recent alumnus investigates the legacy of “filibuster” William Walker M1843—largely forgotten in the US but still perhaps the most hated man in Central America.[...]
After the Armistice.[...]
John Rossi Gr’65 writes about America and baseball.[...]
New studies detail how Penn benefited from slavery.[...]
Nearly two centuries ago, Penn professor Henry Hope Reed put William Wordsworth on America’s cultural map. More or less forgotten today (make that more), Reed was an impressive scholar whose enthusiasm for Wordsworth and English Romanticism helped shape the nation’s literary values. [...]
A focus on mental illness was a constant throughout the multi-faceted career of Benjamin Rush, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, prolific writer, longtime Penn faculty member, and the most prominent—and controversial—physician of his day. [...]
Gazette editor John Prendergast and author Stephen Fried talked about Fried’s new book. [...]
In successfully defending the irascible Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase—aka “Old Bacon Face”—against impeachment, Joseph Hopkinson C1786 G1789 helped set a high bar for removal from office and establish the principle of judicial independence.[...]
Thomas S. Kirkbride M1832 wrote the book—literally—on the housing and treatment of the mentally ill in the 19th century.[...]
Thomas Childers’ The Third Reich: A History of Nazi Germany.[...]
Two new books by Penn faculty explore how free expression on campus became so fraught and what to do about it.[...]
A recent installation at Slought offered manufactured food for thought.[...]
A new book examines a forgotten component of the labor movement.[...]
Erica Armstrong Dunbar C’94 wrote about Ona Judge’s escape from slavery.[...]
Lorene Cary C’78 G’78 on a glorious day in the nation’s capital.[...]
A talk with the authors of Becoming Penn, which traces the University’s development over the tumultuous half-century from the Cold War to the Millennium. [...]
As the nation’s first medical school celebrates its 250th anniversary, a look back at how generations of students, faculty, and alumni have served their country, delivered the finest patient care, and advanced medical research and education here in Philadelphia and around the world.[...]
Daniel Todes spent 25 years researching and writing his epochal biography of Ivan Pavlov. The result is a science historian’s answer to Tolstoy, Turgenev, and Dr. Zhivago.[...]
Medical historian Beth Linker on war and the limits of rehabilitation.[...]