Rifkin’s Next Revolution

Jeremy Rifkin W’67 launched his career as an activist by protesting the Vietnam War. Now he’s making perhaps his biggest impact yet advocating for a “third industrial revolution” to save the world from stagnating productivity and the ravages of climate change.

At the Center of It All

Bob Schoenberg has been leading Penn’s LGBT Center since before there even was one, really. As he retires after 35 years of caring counsel and fierce advocacy, the campus home he built is being renamed in his honor.

Hill Rises

The Eero Saarinen-designed landmark has reopened after a 15-month, $80 million renovation, with its distinctive mid-century style lovingly restored and a host of new amenities for students.

Everybody Comes to Casablanca

In film scholar Noah Isenberg C’89’s engaging investigation of “Hollywood’s Most Beloved Movie,” the lives of the émigré actors who made up most of the cast share the spotlight with the famous love triangle and wartime call to arms. Their stories also echo forward to our own era’s debates over the treatment of refugees and immigration policy.

Prophet of Prosperity

Simon Patten, who led the Wharton School during the Progressive Era, was a pioneer of the economics of abundance, theorist of the second industrial revolution, and intellectual godfather of the New Deal. His descent into obscurity poses provocative questions about how the field has evolved.

Black Box Justice

Richard Berk designs computer algorithms that predict crime. As courts and cops increasingly use his and similar tools to shape everything from parole decisions to street policing, Berk has a warning: accuracy comes at the cost of fairness, and citizens must decide where justice lies.

Ron Gold’s Second Act

After an accident left him paralyzed from the waist down, Ron Gold C’83 W’83 struggled to come to terms with the “different hand of cards” he’d been dealt. But with the help of his wife and family—and some Penn friends—he’s managed to regain his zest for life and launch a new business to help others in his situation.

This Is Us Is His

Long before he created last season’s top-rated new TV show, Dan Fogelman got his start listening to his Penn housemates’ stories and making them laugh with his.

Scanning Sacred Interiors

With his high-tech Baroque Topologies project, associate professor of architecture Andrew Saunders is adding new dimensions to the study of Italian Baroque churches. It’s also serious eye candy.

Mapping the Human Journey

Combining old-school fieldwork and ethnography with up-to-the-minute gene-based analyses, Penn molecular anthropologist Theodore G. Schurr has helped shape our understanding of the movement of ancient peoples into the Americas.

House Dentist

From Holocaust survivors, to stroke victims, to the garden-variety centenarian next door, Alisa Kauffman’s patients have one thing in common: an inability to travel to a dentist’s office. So she brings her practice into their living rooms, bedrooms, and kitchens.

Peter Struck’s Odyssey

The classical studies professor—whose scholarship traces how intellectual concepts and literary works were received and interpreted in ancient Greece and Rome—is an ardent champion of the continued vitality and relevance of liberal arts education in our own time.

When Lies Go Viral

Fake news may be as old as news itself, but the viral deceptions mutating on the internet are affecting the institutions that inform our democracy. Some Penn scholars offer analysis, context, and concerns.